Verb phrases

 In Phrases and Clauses

What are verb phrases? Here is the meaning according to a Google:
“the part of a sentence containing the verb and any direct or indirect object, but not the subject.”
 Okay, so what does that mean and what does it look like? Verb phrases are the part of a sentence which contains a verb plus a dependent – this dependent could be a direct object or and indirect object. As we know verbs are action words.  Words such as write, walk, fly are verbs.
Verb phrases therefore describe what is happening to the subject of the verb in terms of action, or in terms of the condition of the subject.  Verb phrases include both a verb and the object they are describing.  If activities are described, you use active verbs.  If conditions, or states of being, are described, you use linking verbs.  Linking verbs include am, are, was, were, has been, seem, appear, become, taste, stay, and feel.

examples of sentences with verb phrases using active and linking verbs

May walked her dog.  Active verb phrase
He felt blue.   Linking verb phrase
Verb phrases can also function as adverbs or adjectives and contain a verb plus a helping verb, and including objects, or modifiers.
She swam gracefully across the lake.
Nothing was said.
James greedily ate the peach.
The report was hastily written that evening.
Verb phrases enable the dependents – that is the direct or indirect object  – of the verb to provide additional information about the action in the sentence.  Verb phrases therefore describe what is happening to the subject of the verb in terms of action, or in terms of the condition of the subject.  Verb phrases include both a verb and the object they are describing.  If activities are described, you use active verbs.  If conditions, or states of being, are described, you use linking verbs

Recommended Posts

Leave a Comment

Start typing and press Enter to search

Sentences are full of prepositional phrases. Prepositions, when combined with an object, which, as well as nouns and pronouns can also be combined with adjectives or adverbs, gerunds, noun clauses and phrases, are called prepositional phrases.The gerund phrase works in a sentence as a noun, but they are verbs ending with –ing, which operate as nouns. Thus, as functioning nouns, they can be the subject, the subject complements or the object part of the sentence structure.