Conditional Clauses

 In Sentence Structure

There are two kinds of conditional clauses: real and unreal.  Real conditional clauses describes real-life situations.
If I get home early, we will bake a cake. (simple present)
Unreal conditional clauses describe  hypothetical or imaginary situations.
If I  won the lottery, we would buy a small island.(simple past)
If I had known it was raining, I would not have let you walk home. (past perfect)

Conditional clauses are also called conditional sentences and are also referred to as the ‘if clause’
the conditional clauses determine the main clause tense depending on the following:
Real condition possible to fulfill = Simple Present           will-future
Unreal condition in theory possible to fulfill = Simple Past               would + infinitive
Unreal condition (not possible to fulfill, the opportunity is past)  =  Past Perfect   would + have + past participle

The sentence structure can we swapped to have the if-clause at the end
main clause         if-clause
I will go to school        if I am well.
I would go to school     if I was well.
I would have gone to school     if I had been well.
If the main clause is at the beginning of the sentence, you do not need to use a comma.

examples of conditional clauses in literature, quotes and song lyrics

“If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.” Charles Dickens
“If life was fair, Elvis would be alive and all the impersonators would be dead.” Johhny Carson
“If we couldnt laugh, we would all go insane.”Jimmy Buffet
“If women didn’t exist, all the money in the world would have no meaning.” Aristotle Onassis
“If there were no God, there would be no Atheists.” G. K. Chesterton

Conditional clauses are used very commonly in English, to talk about real or unreal situations.
Conditional clauses are also called conditional sentences and are also referred to as the ‘if clause’

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